Community Weathering Station (CoWS) is a pop-up lab for integrating feminist, queer and anti-colonial ethics into community-scaled activities that respond to climate change. To do this CoWS facilitates simple, low-fi and small events like lectures, walks, concerts, workshops and breakfasts, guided by the concept “weathering“. Sometimes these activities are parts of multi-year funded projects, simple one-off community events or a single audio or textual resource that can be returned to over and again.

The next three projects for CoWS across the end of 2022 into 2023 are Songs of Solidarity in collaboration with the Rocky Bottom Girls, a series of Community Dinners funded by the Public Health Network, and the Armidale Food School in collaboration with New England Regional Art Museum.

Most recent activies include “The Armidale Climate and Health Project”. The project wrapped up in April 2022 and a summary article on the project is available here. In 2021, CoWS also collaborated with a geographer and artist at Kings College in London on the Weathering Waterways walks, funded by a grant from the COP26 engagement fund. Audio from this project is available here: https://soundcloud.com/weatheringstation

The Community Weathering Station was devised in 2019 during Armidale’s first major drought event. THe idea was as a place for sharing feelings of fear and anxiety, and learning practices that could reshape one’s approach to the drought. The first outings were market stalls at Groundswell in Bingara on September 7/8 2019, at the Armidale Farmer’s Market on September 15, Lake Zot Breakfast (26th October) and Black Gully Festival on November 9 in 2019, and the Weathering Everything: Mini-Symposium at UNE on 3-4th March, 2020. Read about these on the Blog!

For more info about “weathering” and related projects please go to the Reading & Resources page! For more information about past and upcoming events go to the Workshops & Activities page!

The Community Weathering Station is a settler-led project on Anaiwan land. We pay our respects to original custodians past and present. In rethinking town water practices at CoWS, we acknowledge Indigenous water and land sovereignty; this sovereignty was never ceded.

This is a photo of the recent Survival Skills workshop at UNE Campus